Entries tagged with “fantasy”.


I’m a part of this week’s Mind Meld at SF Signal–read about which genre author I think deserves more recognition. And about which authors Jamie Todd Rubin, Jonathan Laden, Mike Resnick, R. Leigh Hennig, Nick Mamatas, Silvia Moreno-Garcia, Deborah Walker, Eric James Stone, Anna Yeatts, Alex Shvartsman, Lynne M. Thomas, and Marguerite Kenner deemed worthy of more appreciation.

Read all about it at:
http://www.sfsignal.com/archives/2014/08/mind-meld-underappreciated-genre-authors/. And while you’re at it, check out SF Signal. It’s full of fun!

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I have been terribly remiss in keeping up. Life sometimes gets the better of all of us. Several reviews have gone up on buzzymag.com and I haven’t shared! Here are links for your edification: X-Men: Day of Future Past, Maleficent, and How to Train Your Dragon 2.

Some tidbits–here’s what I had to say about Peter Dinklage playing the villain in X-Men: Days of Future Past:
A man who truly believes that mutants are a threat to homo sapiens. They will lead nations out of war with each other to unite in a common cause to destroy all mutants. He absolutely sells it. Trask Industries is a very real threat to mutants everywhere.

What I had to say about the acting in Maleficent:
Angelina Jolie is definitely the star of the show. She does a magnificent job with what she has to work with. This movie sinks or swims on her ability, and much of its success should be laid at her feet. She is by turns vulnerable, furious, vindictive, tender, naive, protective, and aggressive–the list goes on.

And a nibble about How to Train Your Dragon 2:
A great job showing what being able to travel dragon-back has done for the Vikings of Berk. The world is now a bigger place, growing the focus of the film to more than just Berk, and adding a bunch of characters. And a bunch of dragons. Lots of dragons. Tons of dragons.

Full reviews, as always, available at buzzymag.

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Godzilla plushie

The Toho Japanese monster movies were a staple of my childhood, and my love of them has never faded. This is a really fun updated version and I enjoyed every glimpse of the giant lizard (Blue Oyster Cult’s 1978 hit played in my head every time he showed up). See my full review at Buzzymag.

An excerpt:
All of the traditional characters are represented: the scientist who is looking for answers, the man who knows more than he’s willing to tell, the heroic family man stuck in something beyond his control, the stubborn military man, and even the obligatory cute kids.

Graphic at the top is a 50th anniversary plushie, complete with light-up eyes and Godzilla roar.

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Author Peter J. Wacks just pointed me toward http://storybundle.com/ – an opportunity to pick up a group of epic fantasy ebooks for . . . whatever you choose to pay. Authors include Neil Gaiman, David Farland, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Peter David, and Brandon Sanderson.

There are lots of choices here: how the money is divided among the packager and the authors, whether you’d like some of it to go to charity, which books make up your package. No matter how you slice it, it’s a great deal!

But it’s a limited-time offer, so get ’em while they’re hot!

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This movie picks up after the events of The Avengers, with the world reeling after the discovery of super-powered beings and picking up the pieces after the Battle of New York. There’s more Asgard this time, more physics, and some dark elves for good measure. And it all happens as the planets are moving into a great convergence. See what I had to say at at buzzymag.

An excerpt:
I’ll say up front that I loved this movie, and a big part of it is the awesomeness that is Tom Hiddleston as Loki.

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The latest attempt to capitalize on the young adult market that so loved the Harry Potter series steps up to the plate with The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones. It’s got great special effects, but doesn’t explain things as well as it might, and there’s a definite lack of adult supervision. See my full review at buzzymag.

An excerpt:
What glimpses we do get of the world are tantalizing and interesting, including a trip to the titular City of Bones, watched over by the Silent Brothers, under the cemetery, where the bone and ashes of dead Shadowhunters are laid to rest. Those remains hold a certain amount of power, when used properly.

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A fun enough franchise, the new Percy Jackson film (Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters) fails to take any real risks, and any character growth seems forced. Mostly, it’s just a rehash of the “Am I good enough?” plotline from Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief. My full review is at buzzymag.

Ab excerpt:
Percy Jackson isn’t like a potato chip–you can watch just one. The second? Leaves you bloated, uncomfortable and a bit confused . . .

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Monsters University, Pixar’s anticipated follow-up to Monsters Inc. takes a step back from the Scarers at the Scream Factory of Monsters, Inc. and shows us a happier time, when things were slower and less competitive–college! See my full review at buzzymag.

An excerpt:
The movie begins with Mike, as he and his class at Frighton Elementary tour the Scare Floor at Monsters, Inc. and he is inspired to become a Scarer himself. He works hard and gets good grades.

And he goes to Monsters University to follow his dream. Early shots of MU are great.

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And four, well that’s even better. Especially when they’re really, really good and just a touch obnoxious.

And they have better tricks than anyone ever has. Is is real magic?

An excerpt:
The Four Horsemen are committing crimes. Or are they? What they’re doing is impossible, unless real magic somehow exists. When a bank robbery becomes a part of the act in Vegas, FBI Agent Dylan Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo) bursts on to the scene, interrogating everyone in sight.

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Another visually stunning animated fantasy movie, this one from Blue Sky. Amazing performances highlight a really cute story. See my full review at buzzymag.

An excerpt:
Of course, you rapidly discover that all is not as it seems: unknown to us human “stompers,” the forest is teeming with tiny people, an entire society too small for us to see.

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